Idyl E3 Entity Extraction Engine AWS Reference Architectures

With the popularity of running Idyl E3 Entity Extraction Engine on AWS we wanted to provide some AWS reference architectures to help you get started deploying Idyl E3 to AWS. Don’t forget Idyl E3 is available on the AWS Marketplace for easy launching and we have some Idyl E3 CloudFormation templates available on GitHub. We offer managed Idyl E3 services is you prefer a hands-off approach to Idyl E3 deployment and operation.

A Few Notes Before Starting

Using a Pre-Configured AMI

No matter what architecture you choose we recommend creating a pre-configured Idyl E3 AMI and using it to launch new Idyl E3 instances. This method is recommended instead of relying on user-data scripts to perform the configuration because the time required to spin up a pre-configured AMI can be significantly less than user-data scripts. If you want to have the AMI configuration under source control I highly recommend using Hashicorp’s Packer to build the AMI.

Stateless API

Before we describe the architectures it is helpful to note that the Idyl E3 API is stateless. There is no session data necessary to be shared by multiple instances and as long as all Idyl E3 instances are configured identically (as they should be when behind a load balancer), it does not matter which instance gets routed the entity extraction request. We can take advantage of this stateless architecture to allow us to scale Idyl E3 up (and down) as much as we need to in order to meet the demands of the load.

Load-balanced Architecture

The first architecture is a very simple one yet probably adequate to meet the needs of most users. This architecture has a single VPC that contains two subnets. One subnet is public and it contains an Elastic Load Balancer (ELB) and the other subnet is private and it contains the Idyl E3 instances. In the diagram shown below, the ELB is set to be a public ELB allowing Idyl E3 requests to be received from the internet. However, if your application will also run in the VPC you can change the ELB to an internal ELB. Note that this architecture uses a fixed number of Idyl E3 instances behind the ELB. Any scaling up or down will have to be performed manually when needed. Idyl E3’s API has a /health endpoint that returns HTTP 200 OK when everything is ok and that is perfect for ELB instance health checks.

Simple Idyl E3 AWS Architecture with VPC and ELB

Load-balanced and Auto-scaling Architecture

Launch the Idyl E3 CloudFormation stack!

The previous architecture is a simple but very functional and it minimizes cost. The first thing that will be noticed in this architecture is the static nature of the Idyl E3 instances. To provide some flexibility we can modify this architecture a bit to put the Idyl E3 instances into an autoscaling group. We can use the group’s Desired Capacity to manually control the number of Idyl E3 instances or we can configure the autoscaling group to automatically scale up and down based on some chosen metrics. The average CPU usage is a good metric for scaling Idyl E3 because entity extraction can cause the CPU usage to rise. With that change here is what our architecture looks like now:

Idyl E3 AWS architecture with VPC, ELB, and autoscaling.

With the autoscaling we don’t have to worry about unexpected surges or decreases in entity extraction requests. The number of Idyl E3 instances will automatically scale up and down based on the average CPU usage of all Idyl E3 instances. Scaling down is important in order to keep costs to a minimum. Nobody wants to pay for more than what they need.

This architecture is available in our GitHub repository of Idyl E3 CloudFormation Templates. The template also contains an optional bastion instance to facilitate SSH access into the Idyl E3 instances from outside the VPC.

Need more?

Got more complicated requirements? Let us know. We have AWS certified engineers on staff and we’ll be glad to help.

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